Russia’s so-called referendums in Ukrainian regions ‘null and void’, says PACE

Published in Politics
Wednesday, 19 October 2022 14:06

STRASBOURG. PACE has strongly condemned the attempted annexation of Ukrainian regions by Russia, describing the so-called referendums in these regions as “an affront to international law” and “null and void, with no legal or political effects”.

The Assembly was debating a report by Emanuelis Zingeris (Lithuania, EPP/CD) on further escalation in Russia’s aggression against Ukraine, following a video address by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy.

In a resolution, adopted unanimously, the parliamentarians called for a “comprehensive system” to hold the Russian Federation and its leadership accountable for its aggression and violations of human rights and humanitarian law – including speeding up the establishment of a special ad hoc tribunal to prosecute the crime of aggression against Ukraine.

The Assembly also called on Council of Europe member states to declare the current Russian regime as “a terrorist one”. It said the unleashing of a war of aggression by a permanent member of the UN Security Council “posed a challenge to global governance” and noted increasing support for reform of the Security Council.

Russia’s increased threats of nuclear warfare were incompatible with the responsibilities of a nuclear power holding a permanent seat on the Council, the parliamentarians said, as well as being “abhorrent and reckless”.

These issues should feature highly on the agenda of any future Fourth Summit of the Council of Europe, the Assembly added.

By the decision of the Prime Minister of Georgia, a Ukrainian-speaking sector was opened in Tbilisi

Published in Education
Friday, 15 April 2022 17:14

By the decision of the Prime Minister of Georgia, Irakli Gharibashvili, the Ukrainian language sector was opened at the 41st Grushevski Tbilisi Public School. From today, Ukrainian students will have the opportunity to receive general education in their native language in Georgia. The Minister of Education and Science of Georgia, Mikheil Chkhenkeli participated in the opening ceremony, and addressed the audience and  personally congratulated the Ukrainian students and teachers on the establishment of the new sector.

Mikheil Chkhenkeli: "Today is a truly historic day – owing to the decision of the Prime Minister of Georgia, Mr. Irakli Gharibashvili, a Ukrainian-language sector was opened here at the 41st Mikheil Grushevski Tbilisi Public School, which means that Ukrainian students will receive general education in their native tongue.

The opening of the Ukrainian-language sector is a clear example of the great support of our brotherly Ukrainian nation by the Government of Georgia and the Georgian people as a whole. The Ukrainian sector ceased to function at 41st Tbilisi Public School in 2011. Nevertheless, today, I am immensely proud that for the first time in 11 years, thanks to the efforts of our government, Ukrainian students in Georgia will have the opportunity to study in Ukrainian, their mother tongue.

As a result of tireless work, the predesignated team at the Ministry of Education and Science of Georgia returned the Ukrainian-languagesector to the 41st Tbilisi Public School in exactly 2 weeks, where the entire teaching process will be conducted in Ukrainian language, from the first to the 11th grade.

In close cooperation with the Embassy of Ukraine in Georgia, we have selected qualified teachers, whose salaries will be provided entirely by the Government of Georgia.

We are constantly expressing our support to the Ukrainian people, which is reflected in concrete steps. Please note, that owing to the decision of the Government of Georgia, Ukrainian students are enrolled at Georgian schools in an expedited and simplified manner.

Dear students and teachers, I believe you will make new friends in this warm and caring environment, and you will make both Ukraine and Georgia proud of you

Congratulations once again on this historic day and good luck!"

The opening ceremony was also attended by Andriy Kasyanov, Charge d'Affaires of Ukraine in Georgia, who thanked the Prime Minister of Georgia, Irakli Gharibashvili and the Minister of Education and Science of Georgi, Mikheil Chkhenkeli for their support of the Ukrainian people. In his words, this is a great expression of support, as the Georgian side ensured the opening of the Ukrainian-language sector in the shortest possible time.

The school will offer educational, medical and psychological services to students enrolled in both the Georgian and Ukrainian sectors. Upon arrival, Ukrainian students had the possibility to inspect a library equipped with juvenile Ukrainian Language and Literary works.

Ukrainian Online Attractions Worth Checking Out During Quarantine

Published in Culture
Monday, 04 May 2020 16:02

Staying under quarantine due to the novel coronavirus poses challenges beyond just wearing masks and working from home. It also probably means you’re in for a lot of boredom, a lot of binge-watching, and a lot of scrolling your newsfeed. We’ve picked up the best Ukrainian online attractions that can help you to spend your quarantine time in Ukraine, wherever in the world you are!

Start with UkraineWOW, an interactive exhibition-trip around Ukraine and with Ukraine as a companion. It features a variety of rare items such as cubist works by Ukrainian-born sculptor Oleksandr Arkhypenko, silver hryvnia coins that date back to the Kyivan Rus, and much more. The virtual tour through the exhibition will not only show you why Ukraine is such a wowing country, but also give you the authentic feel of a journey by train that you may be missing during the quarantine.

If you are longing for outdoor activities, try going for a virtual walk through Ukrainian open-air museums. This website was created by the Ukrainian Ministry of Culture in cooperation with Google, and features seven open-air museums in different parts of the country. Guests can tour the unique ethnographic collection, learn more about their ancestors' lives, and feel the authenticity of Ukraine.

For those who can't  imagine life without travel, there's the Explore Ukraine! movie by Ukrainer, where you can discover the whole of Ukraine from above in 36 minutes with. It will show you how huge, multi-faceted, and undiscovered Ukraine is. You can also take a 360° virtual bike ride in a video by the Ukrainian Institute to explore the main sites of Ukrainian cities.

Art lovers can enjoy a 3D-tour of the Khanenko Museum, the top world art museum in Ukraine. Its collection includes original artworks by outstanding European masters, such as Pieter Paul Rubens, Gentile Bellini, Juan de Zurbarán, Jacques-Louis David, and François Boucher. You can find here beautiful and rare pieces of Iranian, Tibetan, Chinese and Japanese fine and decorative art, as well as small but interesting collections of ancient Greek, Roman, and Egyptian art.

The Odesa Western and Eastern Art Museum also has a large collection including works by Caravaggio, Gerard David, Jan van Scorel, Rubens, Abraham Bloemaert, Frans Hals, and others. Artwork from of China, Japan, India, Iran, and Tibet is also represented in the gallery, so you can discover the art of two continents at once while sitting on your sofa with the virtual tour around the museum.

Fans of performing arts who miss their visits to the theatre can follow the Lviv National Opera YouTube channel, which broadcasts opera and ballet every Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The recordings of operas like Madame ButterflyNabucco, and Don Carlos are also available on the channel.

Meanwhile, Ukrainian pop musicians have followed the example of Robbie Williams and Coldplay and staged online shows, so you can listen to "home concerts" by JamalaO.TorvaldThe HardkissMELOVINFiolet, and NK. If you are looking for a more unique sound, also check out the Mariologia concert performed by the contemporary music vocal ensemble Alter Ratio. The concert was organised by the Ukrainian Institute in Vienna in 2019, but now you have a great opportunity to catch up.

In case your watch list is already empty, services that stream Ukrainian films can provide you with some interesting titles. The brand new online Ukrainian cinema site Takflix provides English subtitles for all the films it streams. Its movie library is not large, but already some great films on offer, including "Hutsulka Ksenya," a musical about love and discovery in the Carpathian Mountains, and "Heat Singers," a documentary about utility workers in Ivano-Frankivsk who also love to sing. If you are fond of documentaries, also check out Docuspace. The films on it tell the stories of Ukrainians trying to make positive changes in their country and communities.

The Ukrainian online-TV service OLL.tv also offers some Ukrainian movies for English-speaking audiences. One of these is the famous Ukrainian film "The Tribe" by Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy, which won four prizes at Cannes Film Festival in 2014. The plot of this social drama evolves in Ukrainian boarding school for the deaf people, so the story is told entirely through sign language.

There's no reason to be bored, annoyed, or angry about staying home under quarantine now - take it as a chance to learn more about Ukraine.

 
 
MARIA SIDENKO
journalist at UkraineWorld and Internews Ukraine

 

Why Are Cossacks Key to Understanding the Ukrainian Nation?

Published in World
Monday, 03 June 2019 16:42

The Ukrainian Cossack has come to symbolize Ukraine’s ethnic image, much like the medieval knight of Western Europe or the Samurai of Japan. In fact, only a minority of Ukrainians belonged to this famed social group – but their influence on history, culture, and the psychology of the country was deeply profound. If you know the history of the Cossacks, you won’t be surprised to find that Ukrainians, who seem quiet and humble at first sight, can go to protest on Maidan and become courageous warriors.

ZAPORIZHIAN SICH (FORTRESS): THE EMERGENCE OF GLORY
Historical sources tell us that the Ukrainian Cossacks came from a variety of nationalities and social groups. Their ancestors came from Ukrainian, Russian, Polish, and Tatar territories, and migrated at great risk to the southern steppes to hunt, fish, gather honey, and make handicraft goods.

The first references of the Cossacks appear at the end of the 15th century, and their fame spread throughout Europe over the next hundred years. Their raids and robberies intimidated Turkey, and their support of Poland in campaigns against the Muscovites shook the throne of Moscow.

At the beginning of the 16th century, Christian believing European governors considered the Cossacks to be crucial allies in their war against the Ottoman Empire. In 1621, Lithuanian-Polish troops battled the Ottoman Empire at Khotyn. There, Cossack troops, headed by Hetman Petro Sahaidachny, joined Polish-Lithuanian forces and they stopped the Turkish army at its borders.

After that, the Zaporozhian Cossacks began to impose increasingly big social requirements on the Commonwealth. The reaction of the Poles did not satisfy the Cossacks, so they raised a rebellion under the leadership of Hetman Bohdan Khmelnytsky. It ended with the creation of Cossack autonomy.

Ukrainian Cossacks gained their independence in 1649. That year, as a result of the Zboriv agreements between the leaders of the Rzeczpospolita and Cossack hetman Bohdan Khmelnytsky, it was formed as part of the Kyiv, Chernihiv, and Bratslav regions (called "voivodeships", areas administered by a voivode orgovernor) to the east of the Sluch River.

It was the Cossacks who spread and popularized the term "Ukraine", which had not been used in the pre-Cossack era, as the name of their territories.

ZAPOROZHIAN COSSACKS: ORDER AND DEMOCRACY
Historians consider Zaporozhian Cossacks to be the first purely Ukrainian society. As aproto-state nation, it fought for the right to exist, develop, and resist hostile encroachments. The Cossack army created its own, uniquely developed state-administrative structure, which fundamentally different from similar structures of neighboring states. They received foreign ambassadors, concluded international agreements, and so on. However, the titles of the Cossack aristocracy did not have any weight in the eyes of foreign elites.

The laws of the Zaporizhian Sich were rather strict. For theft or killing of one of his congeners, a Cossack could be buried alive with the dead one or beaten to death with batons. This was not particularly humane treatment, but it helped to maintain excellent discipline.

LEGENDS: KHARAKTERNYKS AND SUPERNATURAL FORCES FOR ASSISTANCE
Legends say that there were unusual people called "Kharakternyks"among the Cossacks. People believed that they originated from ancient pagan magicians who possessed secret knowledge and were even able to predict the future. Some historians maintain that after the adoption of Christianity in Kyivan Rus, pagan magicians were persecuted and moved to the wild steppe where the Zaporizhian Sich was established later. There, Kharakternyks taught warriors martial arts, rituals, and customs.

Supposedly, the Kharakternyks could neither be burned in fire nor be drowned in water. They were said to speak twelve languages, turn into wolves and other animals, catch bullets and kernels with their hands, walk on water and even breath under water. Legend has it that they lived for a very long time and were extremely strong – and only silver bullets could kill them.

MODERN COSSACKS: UKRAINIAN GUIDED TOURS
Nowadays, Khortytsia Island , where the Zaporizhian Sich was established, is the largest island on the Dnipro River and is 12.5 kilometers long. It is included in the list of Seven Wonders of Ukraine. The island is integrated into the infrastructure of the city of Zaporizhzhia. You can find a lot of awesome attractions to spend the whole weekend throughout its territory.

Here, the life of Ukrainian Cossacks is recreated to the smallest details. Khortytsia has the unique Museum of the History of Zaporozhian Cossacks. In addition, they created the Historical and Cultural Complex "Zaporizhian Sich". This is a generalized reproduction of the Cossack capital, presenting its main building: the church, the kuren' (house), the office, the military treasury, the school, and the pushkarnia (a place for gunfire).
Tourists in Kyiv can also see a recreation of the everyday lives of Cossacksin the "Mamajeva Sloboda" Open Air Museum in Kyiv. This museum is situated seven kilometers from Khreschatyk – the central street of Kyiv. Its thematic exhibits are spread out on 9.2 hectares and present a full replica of a historical settlement showcasing Ukraine's nature, architecture, and way of life. It provides guided tours in English, German, French, and Italian. One can book a private tour called "Ukraine is a Land of Cossacks" on Tripadvisor from $35.

One can also enjoy a weekend in the Cossack village of Marynivka , which is 30km from Odesa. There one can go on a guided 6-hour tour with a German-speaking guide, where tourists can discover the traditional Ukrainian lifestyle and explore the beautiful landscape that surrounds the area. In addition, one can learn interesting things about Cossack traditions, enjoy authentic cuisine, dress in traditional attire, and sing in a Cossack choir. It costs $60 per person.

Another fascinating tour, which is already opened for booking, is called "In the Footsteps of the Cossacks". This is an iconic journey from Bucharest to Kyiv to Zaporizhzhia along the Dnipro River in Ukraine and the Danube River in Romania aboard the ship "Dnipro Princes". It will start in September 2019 and costs from £1,795 per person for 11 nights.

UKRAINIAN COSSACKS IN EUROPEAN HERITAGE
Cossack history, like the entire history of Ukraine, is a valuable part of Europe's cultural heritage.

The Cossack songs of the Sicheslav (former Dnipropetrovsk) Regionwere included in UNESCO's List of Intangible World Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding.

There is also a database of all the Spanish newspapers of the 17** th **century which mention Ukraine and the Cossacks as well as various military campaigns that took place on the territory of Ukraine. It was created by Ukrainian researcher Oleksandr Scromnitsky. So far, 135 newspapers containing news from Warsaw, Lviv, Vienna, and Istanbul, have been collected. The database currently contains newspapers until 1698, but the author plans to add those published between 1698-1700.You can visit the database of newspapers here.

UKRAINIAN COSSACKS AS A MODERN SEX SYMBOL
Ukrainian Cossacks are still popular in modern media and online culture as examples of strong, fearless and sexy men. Many Ukrainian men and boys want to look like them: Cossack hairdressing is considered stylish and up-to-date. Adults and children practice Boyovyy (Combat) Hopak – a Cossack martial art, which includes techniques of traditional Ukrainian folk fist fighting, folk wrestling, and Cossack war dances.
Modern Ukrainian soldiers who fight in Donbas often copy the forelocks of Cossacks to look like those fearless medieval warriors. After all, the Russian-Ukrainian war is taking place precisely on those territories where the boundary between the Cossacks lands and the Wild Steppe passed in antiquity.

RUSSIAN KAZAKS
When one searches for the English word "Cossacks," search engines often return news and articles that are related to Russia, not Ukraine. Why does that happen? The answer is that Russia had its own Cossacks ( Kazaks ) in Don, Kuban, Terek, Yaik, Sibir and other territories.

Today, there are Registered Cossacks of the Russian Federation – the Cossack paramilitary formation created on the basis of the Federal Law on December 5, 2005. They have become notorious because of their support of separatism in the Donbas and public beatings of opposition politicians and protesters in Russia.

In Russian law, Cossack groups can assist police in public control. For example, these nationalist paramilitaries had an official role in Russia's World Cup. Then, on May 12, 2018, the Kremlin deployed Russian Cossacks to Moscow to suppress protests against the Russian authorities.

________________________________________________________________

Therefore, it is impossible to imagine the history of Ukraine and Europe without the Ukrainian Cossacks. They have always been free fighters on the European borderland; and their territories were Europe's crossroads with the Muslims and Muscovites.

TETYANA MATYCHAK

https://ukraineworld.org/articles/ukraine-explained/why-are-cossacks-key-understanding-ukrainian-nation?fbclid=IwAR1e3axcNeNMrXwERc_y2nwWUrW7X1a8s3EJ732XbubLM6XDA8YdDXNx5-0

5th Ukrainian Film Festival “Ukraine in Focus” is starting in Tbilisi

Published in Culture
Monday, 29 April 2019 10:00

Modern Ukrainian films will be shown in Amirani during May 2-5, 2019 with English and Georgian subtitles

The 5th Ukrainian Film Festival “Ukraine in focus” is starting in Tbilisi on May 2, 2019. Modern Ukrainian movies will be shown in Amirani Cinema (M. Kostava Street No 36/1) during May 2-5 in original language accompanied with English and Georgian subtitles. Poster and event details are available at Official Facebook page of the festival .

The festival “Ukraine in focus” will be opened with a movie “The Wild Fields” (2018) by director Yaroslav Lodygin on May 2, 2019 at 8 pm in Amirani Cinema. Later, during May 3-5, the following movies will be shown in the frameworks of the festival: “The Gateway” (feature film by director Volodymyr Tikhiy, 2017), “Volcano” (Feature film by director Roman Bondarchuk, 2018), Comedy movie “Hero of My Time” (directed by Antonina Noyabrova, 2018), “When the trees fall” (directed by Marysya Nikitiuk, 2018) and selection of short films - winners of Odessa International Film Festival.

As a tradition of 5 years history of the Ukrainian Film Festival in Georgia, the special program for the young audience was prepared. Children and youth can enjoy the following modern feature movies: “Adventures of S Nicholas” (directed by Semen Gorov, 2018) and “Morshyn’s 11” (directed by Arkadii Nepytaliuk, 2019).   

Tickets for the festival movies can be purchased on biletebi.ge, tkt.ge and kinoafisha.ge with a symbolic price of 1 GEL. Therefore, it is highly recommended to buy tickets in advance to secure the available seats.

In addition to the main festival program, an actor’s workshop for kids from famous Ukrainian actors Irma Vitovska and Daria Polunina will take place on May 4, at 2 pm in Amirani Cinema. This activity without any age restriction will involve children in the magic world of cinema and give the possibility to step in actor’s shoes.

Maria Moskalenko, organizer of the event, states: „Ukrainian Film Festival will be held in Tbilisi for already 5th time, and every year this extraordinary event is visited by movie fans of different age and nationality. This year, modern films of various genres were selected and we hope that each attendant will have an opportunity to watch the show in which he/she is interested, familiarize with the world of the Ukrainian films and take something really special from the festival.”

Organizers of the festival are FX Film Georgia and JS Films. The event will be held with the support of Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine, State Agency of Cinema of Ukraine, Embassy of Ukraine in Georgia, Tbilisi City Hall, Georgian National Film Center and Odessa International Film Festival.

Video: https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=380515422541700 

Modernized Past: How Today’s Ukrainian Culture Combines Tradition And Modernity

Published in Culture
Monday, 21 May 2018 16:45

In the 19th century Ukrainian culture was often perceived by its neighbours, like the Poles or Russians, as a land of deep-rooted folk traditions, where music, stories, and dance were driving humanity to its ancestral roots.

This is how Taras Shevchenko, Ukraine’s most famous poet of the 19th century, was perceived in imperial Saint-Petersburg, how Mykola Gogol was reviving demonic Ukrainian folklore for a Russian audience, and how Polish poets like Wacław Zaleski were presenting Ukrainian popular songs, or how Austrian writers like Sacher-Masoch were depicting Galicia, the borderland of his imperial motherland.

In the 20th century, the Soviet regime was busy trying to erase this “national” element. The search of national “depth” was marginalized and then openly persecuted from the 1930s. After World War II, the nostalgia for past traditions sometimes broke through the wall of censorship, creating interesting phenomena, like Ukrainian “poetic cinema” by Sergei Paradzhanov (his world famous film “Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors” is a classic example), Yuriy Illenko, Leonid Osyka, Ivan Mykolaychuk and others; but its creators often paid a high price for their dissidence.

After Ukraine became independent in 1991, and especially in the 2000s and 2010s, this repressed element returned with unprecedented vigour. In order to understand this phenomenon of going back to the past together with searching for modern forms of expression, one has to keep in mind an important insight of the post-independence decades. As national traditions were suppressed for decades, these traditional roots now had a strong emancipatory and freedom potential, which attracted so many artists. It was, therefore, not so much conservative as modern and looking to the future.

Let’s look at the ways in which contemporary Ukrainian culture is looking for this mixture of tradition with modern form and language.

Music

DakhaBrakhaone of the most famous Ukrainian music projects of recent decades, is one example of this traditional-modern mix. Calling their style “ethno-chaos” music, DakhaBrakha was born from the avant-garde theatre Dakh in Kyiv in the early 2000s. It combines traditional Ukrainian song with ecstatic rhythms, bringing a substantial dose of archaism into contemporary music. It is becoming increasingly popular around the world; even David Beckham used it recently in advertising for his brand.

Theatre

Contemporary Ukrainian theatre also often experiments by mixing tradition with modernity, introducing traditional dance, music or costumes into theatrical performances.

We have already mentioned the Dakh theatre, one of the most famous and influential Ukrainian theatrical projects. Launched by Vlad Troitskyi in the 1990s, it became a laboratory for many artists, music groups like DakhaBrakha and Dakh Daugthers, art festivals like GOGOLFEST, etc.

The Lviv-based Les Kurbas theatre is another interesting example of how tradition is being combined with modernityTake a look, for example, at its play Lisova Pisnya (The Forest Song), based upon Lesya Ukrayinka’s classic drama.

Cinema

Ukrainian cinema began to show signs of revival in the 2000s and in the current decade,  especially after Euromaidan (2013-2014), following several decades of decline.

One of the first examples of a new cinema searching for national roots was the picture Mamay by director Oles Sanin. The film tells the story of a Cossack called Mamay (an archetypal figure for Ukrainian culture) and his love for a Crimean Tatar woman.

Ukrainian documentary cinema also pays attention to folklore. Zhyva Vatra (Living Bonfire) by director Ostap Kostyuk tells the story of a little boy by the name of Ivanko, who is involved in old hutsul traditional sheep breeding work. The  language used by peasants, their songs and traditions sound authentic and exotic even for a Ukrainian audience.

Ukrainian folklore tradition is also present in animation, in an elegant artistic animated movie based on Taras Shevchenko’s Prychynna (Причинна), set to be released in 2018.

Another interesting phenomenon is “horror animation” based upon Taras Shevchenko’s work; its authors said they tried to move away from the usual image of Shevchenko and create a modern provocative interpretation.

A more mainstream animation called Mavka, that is based on Lesya Ukrayinka’s Lisova Pisnya, is trying to use Ukrainian folkloric and literary traditions to create an animated story for a wider audience.

Fantasy cinema is also exploring old traditions; look at Storozhova Zastava (Stronghold), which tells the story of a boy who accidentally travels in time to find himself in Medieval Kyivan Rus fighting against nomadic tribes.

In the 19th century Ukrainian culture was often perceived by its neighbours, like the Poles or Russians, as a land of deep-rooted folk traditions, where music, stories, and dance were driving humanity to its ancestral roots.

This is how Taras Shevchenko, Ukraine’s most famous poet of the 19th century, was perceived in imperial Saint-Petersburg, how Mykola Gogol was reviving demonic Ukrainian folklore for a Russian audience, and how Polish poets like Wacław Zaleski were presenting Ukrainian popular songs, or how Austrian writers like Sacher-Masoch were depicting Galicia, the borderland of his imperial motherland.

In the 20th century, the Soviet regime was busy trying to erase this “national” element. The search of national “depth” was marginalized and then openly persecuted from the 1930s. After World War II, the nostalgia for past traditions sometimes broke through the wall of censorship, creating interesting phenomena, like Ukrainian “poetic cinema” by Sergei Paradzhanov (his world famous film “Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors” is a classic example), Yuriy Illenko, Leonid Osyka, Ivan Mykolaychuk and others; but its creators often paid a high price for their dissidence.

After Ukraine became independent in 1991, and especially in the 2000s and 2010s, this repressed element returned with unprecedented vigour. In order to understand this phenomenon of going back to the past together with searching for modern forms of expression, one has to keep in mind an important insight of the post-independence decades. As national traditions were suppressed for decades, these traditional roots now had a strong emancipatory and freedom potential, which attracted so many artists. It was, therefore, not so much conservative as modern and looking to the future.

Let’s look at the ways in which contemporary Ukrainian culture is looking for this mixture of tradition with modern form and language.

Fashion

Ethnic traditions are also inspiring the creativity of Ukrainian fashion designers.

Some of them, like Roksolana BohutskaChernikova , SerebrovaOksana Polonets and others either produce their dresses in the traditional embroidery style (that of vyshyvanka), or create their own new collections inspired by Ukrainian decoration traditions. Handmade or mass-produced vyshyvankas are easy to buy in Ukrainian towns and cities; some projects like Zerno Fashion (zerno.fashion) also make interesting and tradition-inspired clothes available for a wider audience of consumers.

These are just a few examples of how today’s Ukrainian culture is combining tradition and modernity. A similar trend is also present in visual arts, literature, education, design, video games and comics.

An interesting thing about this phenomenon is that it erases the difference between “archaic” and “modern”. It makes national traditions “fashionable”, taking them through a filter of contemporary or avant-garde form.

But it also performs an interesting enterprise: by re-establishing the link between the present and the past it also modernizes the past, making it less archaic than it was before.

Written by Volodymyr Yermolenko, analyst at Internews Ukraine and UkraineWorld

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

This article has been first published on ukraineworld.org

This article has been published with the financial support of International Renaissance Foundation

http://ukraineworld.org/2018/01/the-futures-in-the-past-how-todays-ukrainian-culture-combines-tradition-and-modernity/

“We made it, and we made it together", says Mogherini to mark visa-free travel for Ukrainians

Published in World
Tuesday, 13 June 2017 10:38

On 11 June, EU High Representative Federica Mogherini congratulated Ukrainians on the occasion of the entry into force of the visa liberalisation agreement between the EU and Ukraine. “Today, we bring down a barrier between the people of Ukraine and the people of the European Union. No more visa for short trips between our countries,” said Mogherini in her video speech.

“We made it, and we made it together”, Mogherini continued, addressing Ukrainian citizens. “Ukraine has delivered the reforms its citizens were asking for. And we, in the European Union, we have kept our promise. This is what we call a win-win solution. It will create new opportunities for all of us, strengthening our economies, our security and our friendship. This is what our partnership is all about: making a difference to our citizens’ everyday lives.”

Approved by the Council in May, the agreement provides for visa-free travel for Ukrainian citizens with biometric passports travelling to the EU for up to 90 days in any 180-day period. This may be for tourism, to visit relatives or friends, or for business purposes, but not to work. The exemption applies to all EU countries, except Ireland and the UK, plus Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland.

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