Public Defender Congratulates Population of Georgia on Abkhazian Language Day

Published in Society
Thursday, 27 October 2016 16:09

October 27 is the Abkhazian Language Day and I want to congratulate the Abkhaz community and all Georgia on this day. According to the Constitution, Abkhazian is the second state language. More than 6 500 languages exist in the world, majority of which, according to UNESCO, are in danger of extinction. The Abkhazian Language was, unfortunately, put on that list in 2011.
As per the Georgian legislation and the international law, the Georgian state is obliged to protect, develop and promote all endangered languages on the territory of Georgia, including the Abkhazian language and cultural heritage. Despite many hindering circumstances, I think that more actions can be carried out to save and develop the Abkhazian language. Preferably, the Abkhazian language teaching must be promoted and a variety of programs must be carried out to protect and promote the Abkhazian language in the areas densely populated by Abkhazians or where the relevant demand exists.
I would like to take this opportunity and inform the public that the Abkhazian language was added to the working languages of the Public Defender's official website and hence the Public Defender's activities will be regularly reported in the Abkhazian language. We hope that with this action we will contribute to the protection and development of the Abkhazian language.

 

Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia meet to discuss rare bird preservation

Published in Society
Wednesday, 26 October 2016 16:40
The Emerald biogeographical evaluation Seminar for Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia will take place in Georgian capital Tbilisi on 1-2 December on the topic of bird species in these countries.
Experts from the Council of Europe, country delegations, NGOs of nature conservation and land owners together with Emerald network experts and observers will meet to discuss species, examining the Emerald site proposals for each targeted country. The conference aims to evaluate levels of rate bird species in the proposed and candidate Emerald sites.
The EU-funded programme Emerald Network of Nature Protection Sites, Phase II, is a joint EU-Council of Europe initiative, which contributes to the establishment of the Emerald Network in the Eastern Partnership countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine) and the Russian Federation.

Georgia: EU reports on human rights, media freedom and anti-fraud measures

Published in Society
Wednesday, 26 October 2016 16:25
The European Union and the Council of Europe (CoE) will present the mid-term results of projects for Eastern Partnership countries to media in Tbilisi on 28 October. Representatives from Georgian government, EU Delegation to Georgia and Programmatic Cooperation Framework will present the progress of eight country-specific projects for Georgia.
Project leaders will highlight achievements in the application of the European Convention on Human Rights, healthcare and human rights in prisons, freedom and pluralism of media, internet freedom, combating money laundering and terrorism financing, support to the Georgian Bar Association, as well as electoral assistance and integration of national minorities. 
These projects are carried out in Georgia under the Programmatic Cooperation Framework 2015-2017 which is funded by the EU and the Council of Europe, and implemented by the Council of Europe. The total budget of the projects in Georgia is 3.6 million euros. In addition to these country-specific projects, Georgia also participates in 14 regional initiatives covering all Eastern Partnership.
The EU-Council of Europe Programmatic Co-operation Framework aims to provide extensive and substantial expertise on strengthening the capacity of institutions in the six Eastern Partnership countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine) to implement domestic reforms. It also aims to bring the countries closer to CoE and EU standards in the fields of human rights, democracy and the rule of law, and improve the lives of citizens. The EU’s contribution to the PCF is EUR 30 million.

Council of Europe and European Union to present mid-term results of projects for Georgia

Published in Society
Wednesday, 26 October 2016 14:47

Strasbourg/Tbilisi, 24 October 2016 – On Friday, 28 October, the Council of Europe and European Union will present to media in Tbilisi the mid-term results of projects for Eastern Partnership countries. The focus will be on the eight country-specific projects for Georgia dealing with the application of the European Convention on Human Rights, healthcare and human rights in prisons, freedom and pluralism of media, internet freedom, combating money laundering and terrorism financing, support to the Georgian Bar Association, as well as electoral assistance and integration of national minorities 

The eight projects are carried out in Georgia under the Programmatic Cooperation Framework in 2015-2017  are funded by the EU and the Council of Europe, and are implemented by the Council of Europe. The total budget of the projects in Georgia is 3.6 million Euros. In addition to these country-specific projects, Georgia also participates in 14 regional initiatives covering all Eastern Partnership countries.

Cristian Urse, Head of the Council of Europe Office in Georgia, Janos Herman, Head of the European Union Delegation to Georgia, Tea Maisuradze, the Director of the International Organizations' Department and Inga Kubetsia, Programmatic Co-operation Framework National Coordinator, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Eva Konecna, Programmatic Co-operation Framework Co-ordinator for the Directorate General of Human Rights and Rule of Law of the Council of Europe, will address the participants. Journalists will be able to pose questions to the speakers during the break.

The part of the event during which the project results will be presented is open to media from 10:00-10:30 local time on Friday, 28 October 2016, at Tbilisi Marriot Hotel Ballroom, 13 Shota Rustaveli Ave, Tbilisi 0108, Georgia. Language regime: English – Georgian.

Prior accreditation of media representatives is requested.  Media accreditation is through the Council of Europe’s Office in Georgia, contact person for accreditation: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. +995 (32) 291 38 70 or 71/72

Background:

For more information see http://eap-pcf-eu.coe.int

Information on NATO-Georgia Commission Meeting

Published in Politics
Wednesday, 26 October 2016 14:05

NATO Headquarters in Brussels hosted the NATO-Georgia Commission (NGC) meeting on Strategic Communications at Partnerships and Cooperation Security Committee (PCSC) level. The meeting was chaired by the Senior Director of Integration, Partnership and Cooperation Directorate, Yaroslav Skonieczka. Georgian delegation at the Commission was represented by the Deputy State Minister of Georgia on European and Euro-Atlantic Integration, Mariam Rakviashvili and Deputy Head of NATO Division of International Relations and Euro-Atlantic Integration Department of the Ministry of Defence, Tinatin Mzarelua.
Georgian side provided Allies with exhaustive information on the current challenges of the country, as well as progress achieved in the area of effective strategic communications and future plans in this regard. In the light of existing threats in the region, Allies stressed the significance of strategic communications and positively assessed achievements of Georgian side. Moreover, NATO Allies expressed their readiness to further deepen cooperation in this area and to participate in the implementation of future activities in this regard.
NATO Allies reiterated their support to Georgia's Euro-Atlantic integration at NATO-Georgia Commission meeting

EU Eastern neighbours learn how to improve elections process

Published in Society
Wednesday, 26 October 2016 11:17
The European Union and Council of Europe joint programme has organised a conference to review the implementation progress of Election Observation Missions recommendations. The conference was organised as part of the Programmatic Cooperation Framework for representatives of Eastern Partnership national parliaments, electoral administration, media regulators and civil society organisations on 24-25 October 2016 in Venice.
The aim of the “Follow up to the recommendations of international Election Observation Missions in the countries of the Eastern Partnership” conference was to analyse the recommendations of international Election Observation Missions and to identify a system for technical electoral assistance for each country, individually and for the region.
The EU-Council of Europe Programmatic Co-operation Framework aims to provide extensive and substantial expertise on strengthening the capacity of institutions in the six Eastern Partnership countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine) to implement domestic reforms. It also aims to bring the countries closer to Council of Europe and EU standards in the fields of human rights, democracy and the rule of law, and improve the lives of citizens. The EU’s contribution to the PCF is EUR 30 million.

PACE to observe the 2nd round of the parliamentary elections in Georgia

Published in World
Tuesday, 25 October 2016 18:58

A 5-member delegation of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE), led by Emanuelis Zingeris (Lithuania, EPP/CD), will travel to Georgia from 28 to 31 October to observe the conduct of the second round of the parliamentary elections alongside observers from the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly, the European Parliament and the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR).
The delegation will meet leaders of political parties, the Chairperson of the Central Election Commission, as well as representatives of civil society and the media, before observing the ballot on 30 October.

A joint press conference is scheduled on Monday 31 October (place and time to be confirmed).

List of delegation members

Emanuelis Zingeris (Lithuania, EPP/CD), Chairperson of the delegation

Alfred Heer (Switzerland, ALDE)

Mark Pritchard (United Kingdom, EC)

Co-rapporteurs of the PACE Monitoring Committee:

Boriss Cilevičs (Latvia, SOC)

Kerstin Lundgren (Sweden, ALDE)

NyTimes's article on situation at occupation line in Georgia

Published in Politics
Monday, 24 October 2016 15:44

ARIASHENI, Georgia — Marked in places with barbed wire laid at night, in others by the sudden appearance of green signs declaring the start of a “state border” and elsewhere by the arrival of bulldozers, the reach of Russia keeps inching forward into Georgia with ever more ingenious markings of a frontier that only Russia and three other states recognize as real.
But while dismissed by most of the world as a make-believe border, the dirt track now running through this tiny Georgian village nonetheless means that Vephivia Tatiashvili can no longer go to his three-story house because it sits on land now patrolled by Russian border guards.
That track marks the world’s newest and perhaps oddest international frontier — the elastic boundary between Georgian-controlled land and the Republic of South Ossetia, a self-proclaimed breakaway state financed, defended and controlled by Moscow.Mr. Tatiashvili’s troubles started early in the summer when earth-moving equipment turned up without warning and started digging a wide track through an apple orchard and a field of wildflowers on the edge of the village. He was out at the time, so he avoided being trapped.
There is no fence or barbed wire, but Mr. Tatiashvili does not dare to cross the track to visit his house for fear of being arrested, as his elderly neighbor was, by Russian border guards.
“It is too dangerous for me to go home,” he said, complaining that the boundary has become so mobile that nobody really knows its final destination. Mr. Tatiashvili now lives in his brother’s house, away from the border in the village center.
The destitute mountainous area of South Ossetia first declared itself independent from Georgia in 1990, but nobody outside the region paid much attention until Russia invaded in August 2008 and recognized South Ossetia’s claims to statehood. With that, the territory joined Abkhazia in western Georgia, the Moldovan enclave of Transnistria and eastern Ukraine as a “frozen zone,” an area of Russian control within neighboring states, useful for things like preventing a NATO foothold or destabilizing the host country at opportune moments.
The leader of South Ossetia, Leonid Tibilov, has said he plans to hold a referendum like the one in Crimea in 2014 on whether to request annexation by Russia.
But even without a referendum, the nominally independent country is already Russian territory in all but name. It has its own small security force, but its self-declared frontiers are mainly guarded by Russia’s border service, an arm of the Federal Security Service, the post-Soviet version of the K.G.B. It houses three Russian military bases with several thousand troops and, with no economy beyond a few farms, depends almost entirely on Russian aid for its survival.
The green border signs that first appeared last year and now keep popping up along the zigzagging boundary warn that “passage is forbidden” across what is declared to be a “state border.” Which state, however, is not specified, though locals are in no doubt about its identity.
“Russia starts right here,” Mr. Tatiashvili said, pointing to the freshly dug track that separates his house from Georgian-held land.
“But who knows where Russia will start tomorrow or the next day,” he said. “If they keep moving the line, we will one day all be living in a Russian-Georgian Federation.”
One of the new signs — written in English and Georgian — is just a few hundred yards from Georgia’s main east-west highway, and it puts a short part of an oil pipeline from Azerbaijan to a Georgian port on the Black Sea within territory controlled by Russia.
So tangled is the dispute over what land belongs to whom that each side has its own definition of the line. Russia and South Ossetia insist it is a border like any other — Venezuela, Nicaragua and Nauru also recognize it — while Georgia calls it “the occupation line.” The European Union, which has around 200 unarmed police officers in Georgia to monitor the agreement that ended the 2008 Russian-Georgian war, also says there is no actual border, only an “administrative boundary line.”
Kestutis Jankauskas, the head of the European Union Monitoring Mission in Georgia, said it was hard to know where this boundary line exactly runs. It was never recognized or agreed upon, and its location depends on which maps are used. Russia, he said, is using a map drawn by the Soviet military’s general staff in the 1980s.
It demarcates what in the Soviet era was an inconsequential administrative boundary within the Soviet Socialist Republic of Georgia but what is now hardening into a hazardous frontier.
The fitful movement of the boundary seems to be driven mostly by Russia’s desire to align what it sees as a state border with this old Soviet map. So far, the movement has always been forward, often by just a few yards but at other times by bigger leaps.
Because the line is so uncertain and, in many places, still completely unmarked, Georgian villagers sometimes find themselves on the wrong side and under arrest by Russian border guards or local security officers.
To help get people out of detention, recover cattle that have strayed into Russian-controlled land and settle quotidian disputes like who owns which apple trees or vineyard, Europe’s monitoring mission organizes a monthly meeting of Georgian, Russian and South Ossetian officials.
As happened when the two pro-Russian regions of eastern Ukraine declared themselves independent states in 2014 and said they would like to be absorbed by Russia, President Vladimir V. Putin has mostly feigned ignorance of what his country’s surrogates are up to in Georgia.
Asked in April about South Ossetia’s plans to hold a referendum on joining Russia, Mr. Putin suggested that Moscow was mostly a bystander. But if South Ossetia wants to hold a referendum, Mr. Putin said, “we cannot resist it.”
While Russian military, border and diplomatic personnel have poured into South Ossetia, the local population of Ossetians — an ethnic group whose language is distantly related to Persian — has steadily drifted away, shrinking by around half from a prewar level of roughly 70,000. An ethnic Georgian population of around 25,000 that used to live there has long since fled.
Like Israeli settlements in occupied Palestinian territory, the border markings deep into what Georgia insists is its territory are slowly creating “facts on the ground” that, no matter what the international community might think, are a reality that everyone has to deal with, particularly residents.
Elizbar Mestumrishvili, 75, a farmer who lives next to Mr. Tatiashvili’s now-marooned house, can still get to his home, as it lies on the Georgian side of the new dirt track.
But he is wary of going to the bottom of his garden, which lies within a 60-yard frontier zone that Russian and South Ossetian security officers claim the right to patrol. Pointing to a row of vines drooping with plump grapes, he said it was unwise to walk any farther because “they might come and set up a border post.”
The so-called borderization of a previously vague administrative boundary created political headaches for Georgia’s government ahead of parliamentary elections on Oct. 8. It still won the election but had to fend off attacks from rivals who said it had responded too meekly to Russia’s “creeping annexation.”
When it defeated supporters of former President Mikheil Saakashvili in elections four years ago, a coalition led by Georgian Dream, a party set up by an enigmatic billionaire, pledged to reduce tensions with Russia, which loathed Mr. Saakashvili. Instead, Russian border guards have moved deeper into Georgian territory.
“There is no improvement. I would say the opposite,” Prime Minister Giorgi Kvirikashvili said in an interview. “Unfortunately, Russia never appreciates when you concede or make a step forward or compromise. They always take it for granted.”
All the same, he insisted that even though his government had no intention of repeating Mr. Saakashvili’s disastrous 2008 attempt to confront Russia militarily, the border will not last. “It has no prospect,” he said. “They are trying to build this border, these fences inside our country. We think it is temporary.”

A transformation in Georgia, led by the Georgians

Published in Politics
Friday, 21 October 2016 15:11
Common values and shared interests are driving forward the partnership between Georgia and the EU, the Head of the European Union Delegation to Georgia, Ambassador Janos Herman, has said in an interview with EU Neighbours East project.
Janos Herman believes that values like “democracy, the rule of law, human rights, a market economy” are common for the EU and Georgia. That is the basis of cooperation, with “a clear understanding of the interests of both sides”.
This cooperation has already resulted in concrete achievements, the Ambassador said: “We have increasing trade between us, there are new Georgian exports coming to the European Union market, … there are hundreds and even thousands of cooperatives formed with European Union support… We hope very much that we can contribute also with direct support to the private sector, promoting small and medium-sized enterprises… And there is also the visa liberalisation that will deliver a significant impact for the Georgian population.” 
But, Ambassador Herman insisted, “if you look at the transformation of the country, it is not the impact of the European Union, it is the impact of the Georgians, and the decision of the Georgians to move closer to the European Union.”

NATO representative awarded for the successful mission in Georgia

Published in Politics
Thursday, 20 October 2016 14:03

The First Deputy Minister of Defence of Georgia Lela Chikovani awarded the strategic and operational planning project expert of NATO-Georgia Substantial Package LTC Vincent Henkinet with Kakutsa Cholokashvili Medal. Lela Chikovani thanked the Belgian advisor for his successful mission in Georgia.
Rotation of LTC Vincent Hankin took place after his 6 month-long professional activity in Georgia. He will be replaced by the representative of Armed Forces of Belgium Lieutenant Colonel Claude Moerman who will be working in Georgia under SNGP for six month.
The awarding ceremony was hosted in the Ministry of Defence. The representatives of International Relations and Euro-Atlantic Integration Department of MOD and the military experts from SNGP contributor countries attended the meeting as well.

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