Items filtered by date: Monday, 06 September 2021 - NEWSDAY GEORGIA

-- Entering 2021, the start of China's new five-year plan period, authorities have stepped up regulatory oversight in a number of sectors.

-- Analysts from global financial service firms viewed the regulatory measures as part of China's long-standing efforts to make growth more sustainable and inclusive, which will benefit the regulated sectors and the broader economy in the long run.

-- The regulations are conducive to the long-term growth of the Chinese economy and the capital market, analysts said.

BEIJING, Sept. 5 (Xinhua) -- Some global investors have seemingly observed a "turn" in China's economic governance recently.

In addition to multiple anti-trust probes and data security checks on the country's biggest internet companies, regulators have imposed tough regulations on the off-campus tutoring sector and stepped up food safety checks on popular food brands.

The intensive regulations across sectors have made these investors wonder: Is there a change of course in China's policy direction? How will the regulatory moves affect the capital market and China's economic structure in the long run?

Analysts from global financial service firms viewed the regulatory measures as part of China's long-standing efforts to make growth more sustainable and inclusive, which will benefit the regulated sectors and the broader economy in the long run.

CONNECTING DOTS

Entering 2021, the start of China's new five-year plan period, authorities have stepped up regulatory oversight in a number of sectors.

In April, the country's top market regulator vowed to strengthen anti-trust law enforcement, imposing record fines on the country's tech behemoth Alibaba and launching anti-monopoly investigations into internet giant Meituan.

The off-campus tutoring businesses were put on the brakes in July, when central authorities published guidelines that restricted financing for the for-profit off-campus training companies, in a bid to ease the burden of students.

The country's market regulators have also stepped up crackdowns on food safety violations, carrying out on-the-spot checks on a number of chain stores of popular food brands and urging rectifications from the involved firms.

"The regulatory moves should be framed against the broader context of China's economic transition," said Robin Xing, chief China economist with Morgan Stanley.

For instance, the anti-monopoly regulations addressed issues such as the over-concentration of market power in a few tech giants, which could squeeze the profit margins of small and medium-sized companies, he said.

"The recent policy indicated more emphasis on social equity, which will facilitate a healthier economic structure, more stable growth and happier lives for the people," said Wang Peng, an analyst with Hangzhou-based Yongan Futures.

Shi Jialong, head of China internet and new media research with Nomura, said the regulatory actions on China's internet sector were not aimed at curbing its growth, but a signal to let the big platforms channel their resources and energies away from excessive competition into research on advanced technologies.

"We believe the internet industry, known for its resilience, should be able to adapt to the environment and sustain healthy growth," Shi said.

PREDICTABLE MOVES

The emphasis of quality rather than mere speed of development has long been going on. Since the idea of "high-quality development" was highlighted at the 19th Communist Party of China National Congress in 2017, China has been restructuring its economy in an effort to make growth more sustainable and inclusive.

Battles have been waged to defuse financial risks, eliminate absolute poverty and tackle environmental pollutions. Meanwhile, the deepening of reforms on all fronts has been high on the government agenda to foster a new development paradigm.

The recent meeting of the Central Committee for Financial and Economic Affairs, attended by the country's top policymakers, once again stressed high-quality growth, while emphasizing "common prosperity" in the pursuit of it.

"If you look back, you will find that all the policies can be traced back to the development philosophy outlined in public documents," Wang said.

"Some people missed the signs or failed to fully understand it," he said.

For instance, social equity has always been a policy priority, Wang said.

China is on track to meet its 2021 growth target of "above 6 percent", with a GDP expansion of 12.7 percent in the first half of this year.

"This means the country has left enough room to push policies that are key to long-term development," said Victoria Mio, director of Asian Equities at Fidelity International.

BULLISH PROSPECTS

The regulations are conducive to the long-term growth of the Chinese economy and the capital market, Mio said.

Bullish on the prospects of the Chinese market, Fidelity International has applied to set up a fund management company that it fully owns. The application was approved by China's top securities regulator in August.

Other global asset management giants are increasingly becoming China bulls. In an interview with the Financial Times in August, an investment strategist with BlackRock's research unit recommended investors lift allocations to China's markets.

For Wang, investors have reasons to stay upbeat on Chinese assets.

From the financial market perspective, China's bond yield is among the highest in major economies, while its stock market valuation is lower than most developed economies, Wang said, pointing to the long-term investment value of China's assets.

"Staying confident in China and in its assets is out of question," he said.

 Produced by Xinhua Global Service

Published in CHINA

Two months have passed since the violent events of July 5, but the Georgian Prosecutor's Office has not launched criminal prosecution against any individual for organizing group violence. The Public Defender Nino Lomjaria examined the video footage[1] released by the media and considers that the publicly available evidence reaches the standard of probable cause for launching criminal proceedings against two persons for organizing group violence as well as for publicly calling for violence.

Pursuant to Article 21 (c) of the Organic Law of Georgia on the Public Defender of Georgia, the Public Defender is entitled to request the initiation of an investigation and/or criminal prosecution if the examination of the case shows elements of crime. Accordingly, the Public Defender has already used the authority granted by the organic law and applied to the Prosecutor's Office with a request to initiate criminal proceedings against Zurab Makharadze and Spiridon Tskipurishvili.

The proposal to launch prosecution was based on publicly released videos showing that before the July 5 violence, on Alt-Info TV, Zurab Makharadze and other individuals had been continuously announcing violence against participants in the event planned by Tbilisi Pride. Violent calls were also heard against journalists. The same individuals spread information on television about the formation of groups with the direct purpose of violence on July 5.

It is substantiated in the Public Defender’s proposal that Zurab Makharadze personally led the group violence on July 5, including the removal of protest tents in front of the legislative body and the allocation of various groups to raid the offices of the Shame Movement and Tbilisi Pride.

Finally, according to the Prosecutor General’s Office of Georgia, 53 persons were identified as victims of the group violence on July 5, 2021, and criminal proceedings were launched against 27 persons. However, no one has been prosecuted for organizing group violence.

In addition, the Public Defender made another proposal to the Prosecutor General's Office and demanded the launch of criminal proceedings against Spiridon Tskipurishvili for publicly calling for violent actions. It was established according to the standard of probable cause that on July 5, at about 14:14, the Archpriest of the Georgian Orthodox Church, Spiridon Tskipurishvili, by using a microphone and sound enhancer devices, called on citizens to be violent, thus went beyond the freedom of expression and committed an action forbidden by Article 2391 of the Criminal Code of Georgia – call for violence that creates an obvious, direct and substantial threat of violence.

The Public Defender continues to gather information about the investigation ongoing into the July 5 violence and, if necessary, will again use the authority given to her by the organic law.

Source: https://www.ombudsman.ge/eng/akhali-ambebi/sakhalkho-damtsveli-5-ivliss-jgufuri-dzaladobis-organizebisa-da-dzaladobisken-motsodebis-faktebze-2-piris-mimart-siskhlissamartlebrivi-devnis-datsqebas-moitkhovs

Published in Justice

Business News

Georgia: EU approves first payment of budget support to DCFTA and SMEs

Georgia: EU approves first payment of budget support to DCFTA and SMEs

The EU has approved the disbursement of €6 million to the Georgian state budget, the first tranche o...

Consideration of 2016 budget next Week starts next Week

Consideration of 2016 budget next Week starts next Week

The Georgian Parliament will start consideration of the 2016 budget next week. The Committees schedu...

1 US Dollar equals 2.3906 GEL

1 US Dollar equals 2.3906 GEL

Georgian Lari slightly gained value against US Dollar. Georgian National Bank set the new exchange r...

Silk Road Tbilisi Forum 2015 has started

Silk Road Tbilisi Forum 2015 has started

Silk Road Tbilisi 2015 forum started today. Following the success of the inaugural Routes Silk Road...

MOST READ

« September 2021 »
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30      

About

The News Agency,
NEWSDAY.GE is
a part of STARVISION
Media Group.
It made its first
appearance on the Internet..More

 

Contact

NEWSDAY Ltd.
Lechkhumi street.43

Georgia,Tbilisi

Phone: (+995 32) 257 91 11
E-mail: avtandil@yahoo.com

 

 

 

Social Media