Giorgi Gakharia on Michael Pompeo’s upcoming visit: It is yet another demonstration of the all-time high level of Georgia-US strategic partnership

Published in Politics
Thursday, 12 November 2020 15:34

During today's meeting of the Interagency Coordination Council, Georgian Prime Minister Giorgi Gakharia commented on the upcoming visit of US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo to Georgia, scheduled for November 17-18.

The Head of Government emphasized that it is yet another demonstration of the importance and all-time high level of Georgia-US strategic partnership.

"Our meeting will firstly discuss issues pertaining to the US-Georgia Charter on Strategic Partnership, and we will, of course, speak about the current developments in the South Caucasus, Georgia's further democratization, and economic and security issues. These topics have been suggested by our partners, and we are preparing to discuss them. We all must understand that it is not just a visit by the Secretary of State of our partner country; it is also a visit by Georgia's friend, and we will do everything to make sure that this visit further deepens the remarkable strategic partnership between the US and Georgia, especially in the direction of the critically important ongoing developments in the South Caucasus which will have a serious impact on our country's everyday life, security, and future.

Consequently, despite the COVID-19 pandemic, and despite the challenges we are facing today, we must be fully focused on making ready for this visit," the Prime Minister said.


Press Service of the Government Administration

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    ANTONY J. BLINKEN, SECRETARY OF STATE

    QUESTION: Today we have a chance to talk about the crisis with Secretary of State, U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken. Thank you. Thank you for this opportunity and for your time —

    SECRETARY BLINKEN: It’s good to be with you.

    QUESTION: — and for your effort.

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    US Embassy in Georgia

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